Blog

Keeping Our Eyes Open

Posted on30. Jun, 2012 by .

1

History of Buddhist spirituality lends itself to two very different perspectives. On one hand, it is a history of transmission and continuation, featuring institution building and cultural naturalization. For the most part, this is the story of schools and sects, politics and economy, controlled discourse and imperial sponsorship. On the other hand, it’s also a […]

Continue Reading

Interview with John Peacock

Posted on04. Jun, 2012 by .

0

I’ve recently talked to John Peacock, scholar and Associate Director of The Oxford Mindfulness Centre. His studies of the earliest Buddhist writings have revealed to him a very human Buddha and a very different Buddhism than we know today. Please find the interview at Buddhist Geeks. Part One: Will the Real Buddha Please Stand Up? […]

Continue Reading

Reinventing Buddhist Tantra

Posted on29. Apr, 2012 by .

11

David Chapman has opened a new series of articles entitled “Reinventing Buddhist Tantra.” If you’re not familiar with David’s work so far, especially the series on Consensus Buddhism, please look at the “Consensus: Outline.” The new series on Buddhist tantra is exciting in that it jumpstarts an open and curious discussion on possibilities for a […]

Continue Reading

OpenDharma So Far

Posted on20. Apr, 2012 by .

1

collection of my #openDharma hashtag tweets, starts on August 13th 2011 Buddhahood is always already open source. Learn your code and get to work. Traditional teachings are written in ancient, often obsolete code. Such codes were never designed to be used across platforms. As radical code was standardized and normalized via subroutines, this gave rise […]

Continue Reading

Latest #deepDharma

Posted on20. Apr, 2012 by .

0

starts on April 17th 2011 We are a phase in the great unfolding. What we do in life echoes in eternity. “A lot of good things sound crazy. And a lot of crazy things sound good.” – @hokaisobol Christian “Holy Spirit” = Buddhist “impermanence” = Chinese “chi” God is dead. Are Buddhists the last to […]

Continue Reading

We the Buddhist

Posted on13. Apr, 2012 by .

3

As if yesterday, 20 years ago I enjoyed the work of Rick Fields and his narrative “How the Swans Came to the Lake”, copious writings of Sangharakshita, and later in 2002 the “Westward Dharma” edited by Prebish and Baumann. Reading on Buddhism in the West makes you think of Western Buddhism. 20 years later, and […]

Continue Reading

Path: Stages in Practice (3/3)

Posted on23. Dec, 2011 by .

0

Shingon is an esoteric school of Mahayana, and Mahayana is a bodhisattva doctrine. Bodhisattva is interested in awakening others and himself equally. The general classification of the bodhisattva stages, according to the exoteric teachings, is as follows: a) ten stages of faith, b) ten stages of understanding, c) ten stages of practice, d) ten stages […]

Continue Reading

Path: Stages in Practice (2/3)

Posted on22. Dec, 2011 by .

0

Nirbhaya literally means “fearlessness” or simply “no fear.” In Shingon, it means equanimity. However, it is also synonymous with ashvasa, meaning “to revive,” so it implies a surge of regeneration. Nirbhaya signifies an awakening through freeing oneself from the bonds of klesha and thus awakening to realize one’s inherent wakefulness (skt. bodhi). The six nirbhaya theory describes the […]

Continue Reading

Path: Stages in Practice (1/3)

Posted on20. Dec, 2011 by .

1

In the Mahavairocana Sutra, we find the phrase “mind just as it is,” synonymous to what the seminal Awakening of Faith (skt. Mahayana-shraddhotpada) calls “inherent wakefulness.” Nirvana Sutra calls it buddha-nature (skt. tathagatagarbha or sugatagarbha or buddhadhatu), the Prajnaparamita literature calls it prajna, while the Sukhavativyuha literature calls it “pure land” (we might go as far […]

Continue Reading

Path: Initial Awakening

Posted on18. Dec, 2011 by .

2

The two main visual mandalas used in Shingon – Garbhakosha and Vajradhatu – are iconographic representations of Shingon doctrine, which is a theoretical explanation of the identity of human and the Buddha, based upon the supposition of inherent buddha-nature. This identity of man and Buddha, however, represents the ideal. Human mind is ordinarily covered by […]

Continue Reading